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Lagos Faults EIU’s Report Claiming It As ‘Most Dangerous City’

Lagos Faults EIU’s Report

Lagos State government had faulted the report of the Economist Intelligence Unit, EIU, describing the state as world’s most dangerous city.

The state government described the claim as unintelligent. It argued that contrary to the claim, Lagos State was one of the safest in Africa.

In a statement by the Commissioner for Information, Mr. Gbenga Omotosho, the government said the crime rate had reduced in the state since the introduction of the Lagos State Security Trust Fund (LSSTF).

The statement by Omotoso reads in part: “With its seductive beaches, parks and arts centres, Lagos is the ideal city for a world seeking adventure. It is the home of financial and business giants, who have found in its huge population an attractive market.

“The curtain has just been drawn on the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) Lagos Open during which the city hosted no fewer than 200 players from more than 32 countries. That was after a visit by boxing champion Anthony Joshua.

“French President Emmanuel Macron has had a taste of the city’s exciting entertainment scene, visiting the Afrika Shrine, the late Afrobeat king Fela Anikulapo – Kuti’s club.

“Now, a report by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) has unintelligently described Lagos as the world’s most dangerous city.”

He added:  “Similar to the development vision of its predecessors, the current administration of Mr Babajide Sanwo-Olu has erected Six Pillars of Development (POD) that will drive social development, economic growth and environmental sustainability.

“These strategic paths are charted to position Lagos in its rightful place among smart cities and strengthen its credentials, which have made it a decent home for residents, and a destination of choice for tourists and investors.

“This effort has significantly boosted the reputation of Lagos as one of the safest cities in Africa, and continued to elicit global interests in the vast opportunities in the state.”

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